Conquistador Halberdiers and Pikemen – plus Pedro de Alvarado – for the Battle of Otumba

On July 20, 1520, Hernan Cortes and his Conquistadores found themselves at a significant historical juncture. They had been fighting the Aztecs in retrograde for weeks as they attempted to reach the safety of the lands of their Tlaxcalan allies. Every single one of the Spanish was wounded in some way or another – and they were exhausted from being pursued incessantly by the enraged Aztecs. Cortes and his men had been lucky to narrowly escape from the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan during La Noche Triste. The safety of the lands of their Tlaxcalan allies lay past a nearby mountain pass, just beyond reach.

The Aztecs, with vastly superior numbers, had managed to nearly surround the Spanish and deny them their route to safety. The Conquistadores now were desperately defending a rocky outcropping with pikemen, halberdiers, crossbowmen, and sword and buckler men. The Aztecs wanted nothing less than finishing off the hated Spanish – either by killing them outright or by taking them as captives for ritual sacrifice to their god of war, Huitzilopochtli.

Here, both sides would fight the Battle of Otumba, and the fates of both the Spanish Crown and the Aztec Empire were in the balance.

The Battle of Otumba

You can click on the links I shared above and learn more about the Battle of Otumba. It was a near-run battle – and Cortes and his men were truly in danger of being sent off to oblivion at the hands of the Aztecs. The short version is that Cortes recognized that the Aztec attacks on his position were being coordinated by banners and signalers – all led by the High Priest of Tenochtitlan, Matlatzincatl. Cortes left the infantry on the outcropping to gather together what little cavalry he still had left. Cortes then personally led a cavalry charge to take out Matlatzincatl – and succeeded. Supposedly, it was Cortes himself who was able to dispatch Matlatzincatl with his lance.

At this point, the Aztecs had never before seen nor fought against a cavalry charge. It was indeed one of epic shock and awe. After the death of Matlatzincatl and his signalers, the Aztec attack broke up for wont of command and control, and Cortes and his men were able to make it to safety. This would allow them to regroup, get reinforced, and eventually destroy the Aztec Empire. Therefore, this was probably one of the Aztec’s last and best chance to annihilate the Spanish. By failing to do so – though many more battles would be fought – the seeds of the ultimate demise of the Aztec Empire were irrevocably sown.

As one of my scenarios for my games of Feudal PatrolTM  using my supplement for Civilizations Collide, I have designed a gaming scenario for the Battle of Otumba. It is a skirmish-type scenario but one that will hopefully evoke the spirit of the battle. For the Conquistadores, I already have adequate cavalry figures for Cortes’ charge. As discussed, from my research it appears that the Spanish took up their defensive position on the rocky hillock using pikemen and halberdiers almost in an infantry square. As I only had one pikemen figure that had come from Eureka Miniatures as a war dog handler, that would be insufficient to say the least.

My digging around websites yielded me three sources that I drew upon to remedy this shortfall: Eureka Miniatures USA (4 halberdiers from #100CON03); Wargames Foundry via Badger Games in the US (2 halberdiers from two #SBO16 that were part of a couple of artillery gun crews); Gringo 40’s (UK) (8 pikemen from #CONQ4 and a Pedro de Alvarado figure.) All of these figures were 28mm scale and metal. This group would get me to where I wanted to be.

A side note about Pedro de Alvarado. He was a key lieutenant of Cortes and a prominent player in the Spanish Conquest. He was a redhead, which was a novelty to the Aztecs. He is remembered both for his skills as a soldier and especially for his cruelty and acts of mass murder on native peoples – both Aztec and Maya. However, he played a big role at many battles, including the Battle of Otumba, and as Gringo 40’s had his figure, I got him as well. As I always say, in the Spanish Conquest, there were few “good guys” on either side. History must be understood in the context of the period – and it was a brutal one.

Pedro de Alvarado

These figures arrived in December, and were definitely in my sights as submissions for  Dave Stone’s “Paint What You Got” painting challenge in addition to my war canoes and Aztec Serpent Statues.

I filed and washed the 15 figures in preparation for mounting for painting and priming. However, let me share a few notes. I liked all of the figures as far as the sculpts go. However, the Gringo 40’s pikemen were only available in one pose – which I ordered nonetheless as I figured that I could deal with via a painting plan (so they would look different enough from each other). These also had a pike included – but it was a soft metal pike that would not have survived a gaming session.

I replaced them with ones from North Star Military Figures cut to the same size as the originals. I have used these spears on other projects – notably my beloved Rooman Pikemen – and they are nice but VERY sharp (I recommend filing down the tips a bit or you and your players will have a hypodermic battlefield with real blood).

The Gringo 40’s also came with nice swords that I liked. Both the pikemen and the halberdiers needed a good deal of pin vise drilling to accommodate their weaponry. Alvarado came in two pieces but is a great sculpt. The Wargames Foundry figs were also two of the same – so more challenge for me to make their appearance dissimilar. The Eureka halberdiers were nice too.

After a nice scrubbing, all 15 ready to go forward to mounting for painting.
Mounted and primed.

One of the challenges I found was airbrush priming of the pikes, halberds, swords, and Alvarado’s sword (and hands). This was difficult due to their being easily moved by the air pressure. I broke out my holder rack to use – and it helped – though I did need to deal with subsequently painting the parts under the clips.

Holder rack.

After priming in white, I washed them all with a 50% thinned application of Citadel “Nuln Oil” as shown below.

I worked on the base coats by using an Excel sheet paint plan as I needed a lot of paints to make this work – especially for the pikemen. I did make use of several contrast paints here as well – but I used them in combination with other products to shade and highlight. When you are trying to give 8 different pikemen different beards/hair, tunics, leggings, etc., you do end up with a good number of permutations! As usual, I list of all the paints, inks, washes, etc. that I used at the end of this post if that sort of thing interests you.

Finally all of the figures here are painted, shaded, and highlighted – they still needed flocking and varnishing as you see.
I flocked the bases first with PVA glue and Army Painter “Brown Battlefields”.
Then I added pigments to the bases and fixed with thinner, and let them dry.
Once dry, I dry brushed them with three brown/tan tones, then applied matte varnish via airbrushing. This is the recipe I used for most of my figures for the Spanish Conquest.

After the varnish dried, I added Army Painter “Grass Green” and 12mm jungle tufts from Shadow’s Edge Miniatures. I did add the tufts as they will help the bases blend with my rocky outcropping/hill I have for the battle – and I have found them to be the best tufts on the market.

I numbered my halberdiers CHB 1-6 and my pikemen are CPM 2-9. Alvarado is Alvarado! So, here they are as completed – first Pedro de Alvarado from Gringo 40’s:

Pedro de Alvarado

Next, the halberdiers. CHB1-4 are from Eureka, and CHB5 and 6 are the same figure from Wargames Foundry.

CHB1
CHB2
CHB3
CHB4
CHB5
CHB6
Group Halberdier Shot
Halberdiers completed and ready for action.

Lastly, here are the pikemen, CPM2-9. All are from Gringo 40’s and are the same sculpt – but hopefully I have varied them enough in color and appearance.

CPM2
CPM3
CPM4
CPM5
CPM6
CPM7
CPM8
CPM9
Pikemen Group Shot
All 15 of these Conquistadores
You can almost here them yell their rallying cry, “¡Santiago!”

I am looking forward to their upcoming game at TotalCon36 in Marlborough, Massachusetts on February 27th. I am also running two other Spanish Conquest games there on Thursday, February 24 (Surprise Raid on the Aztec Outpost) and Saturday February 26 (Cortes’ Causeway Escape Attempt), as well as a What a Tanker game (France 1940) on Friday. Slots for all are still available – come on down!

I now have painted 92 Conquistador, 32 Tlaxcalan, and 109 Aztec figures since I started this project. I still have more to go – specifically brigantines and cannons with crews, and a good-sized group of Maya. I hope that you found this rather lengthy post interesting. Yes or no, let me know and thanks for checking in.

Miscellaneous details and references for those interested in that sort of thing:

For all of my previous posts on games, units, and other projects for my 16th Century Spanish Conquest supplement for Feudal Patrol™ – “Civilizations Collide” – please see this page.

PAINTS, INKS, GLAZES, SHADES, WASHES, PIGMENTS, FLOCKING, GLUES AND MORE THAT I USED ON THESE CONQUISTADOR FIGURES:

  1. Gorilla Glue
  2. 1/8″ x 1″ Everbilt Fender Washers
  3. Gorilla Glue Gel
  4. Poster tack
  5. North Star Military Figures 100mm wire spears
  6. Vallejo Mecha Primer “White”
  7. Vallejo “Flow Improver”
  8. Vallejo “Airbrush Thinner”
  9. Citadel “Nuln Oil” (wash)
  10. Vallejo Mecha Color “Off-white”
  11. Battlefront “Black”
  12. Vallejo “Thinner Medium”
  13. Army Painter “Tanned Flesh”
  14. Vallejo Model Color “English Uniform”
  15. Vallejo Model Color “Black Grey”
  16. Citadel “Troll Slayer Orange”
  17. Citadel “The Fang”
  18. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Volupus Pink”
  19. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Basilicanum Grey”
  20. Vallejo Model Color “Brown Rose”
  21. Citadel “Runefang Steel”
  22. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Wyldwood”
  23. Citadel “Skrag Brown”
  24. Vallejo Model Color “Vermilion”
  25. Citadel “Caliban Green”
  26. Vallejo Game Air “Sun Yellow”
  27. Citadel “Steel Legion Drab”
  28. Vallejo Model Air “Brown”
  29. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Gore-Grunta Fur”
  30. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Talassar Blue”
  31. Vallejo Mecha Color “Sky Blue”
  32. Vallejo Mecha Color “Grey Green”
  33. Vallejo Game Ink “Black Green”
  34. Secret Weapon Washes “Blue” (ink)
  35. Vallejo Game Air “Wolf Grey”
  36. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Apothecary White”
  37. Vallejo Model Air “Dark Blue”
  38. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Aethermatic Blue”
  39. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Shyish Purple”
  40. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Contrast Medium”
  41. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Magos Purple”
  42. Vallejo Game Ink “Violet”
  43. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Blood Angels Red”
  44. Vallejo Mecha Color “Turquoise”
  45. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Space Wolves Grey”
  46. Hataka “Gris Blue Clair”
  47. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Ultramarines Blue”
  48. Vallejo “Glaze Medium”
  49. Citadel “Castellan Green”
  50. Battlefront “German Camo Orange Ochre”
  51. Citadel “Contrast Paint – Snakebite Leather”
  52. Vallejo Mecha Color “Light Steel”
  53. Vallejo Model Air “Gun Metal”
  54. Vallejo Model Air “Bright Brass”
  55. Vallejo Model Air “Black – Metallic”
  56. Citadel “Waystone Green” (Technical)
  57. Citadel “Nuln Oil GLOSS” (wash)
  58. Vallejo Game Color “Bronze Fleshtone”
  59. Vallejo Model Color “Sunny Skin Tone”
  60. Army Painter “Flesh Wash” (wash)
  61. Army Painter “Red Tone” (shade)
  62. Citadel “XV-88”
  63. Army Painter “Green Tone” (shade)
  64. Citadel “Agrax Earthshade GLOSS” (shade)
  65. Citadel “Drakenhof Nightshade” (wash)
  66. Citadel “Seraphim Sepia” (wash)
  67. Vallejo Game Ink “Green”
  68. P3 “Red” (ink)
  69. Vallejo Game Ink “Yellow”
  70. Citadel “Lamenters Yellow” (glaze)
  71. Battlefront “Flat Earth”
  72. Vallejo “Satin Varnish”
  73. Elmer’s PVA Glue
  74. Army Painter “Brown Battlefields” (flocking)
  75. Vallejo “Dark Yellow Ochre” (pigment)
  76. Vallejo “Burnt Umber” (pigment)
  77. Citadel “Tallarn Sand”
  78. Citadel “Karak Stone”
  79. Vallejo Mecha Varnish “Matt Varnish”
  80. Army Painter “Grass Green” (flocking)
  81. Shadow’s Edge Miniatures 12mm “Jungle Tufts”

Ruined Buildings & Rusty Sci-Fi Walls

As I described in my previous blog post, I wanted to work on expanding my collection of terrain in order to enhance the visuals and improve play for my retro sci-fi Combat Patrol™ games.  Specifically, I wanted to add some ruined and battle-damaged buildings and rusty walls.  However, I wanted them to look great – […]

As I described in my previous blog post, I wanted to work on expanding my collection of terrain in order to enhance the visuals and improve play for my retro sci-fi Combat Patrol™ games.  Specifically, I wanted to add some ruined and battle-damaged buildings and rusty walls.  However, I wanted them to look great – and weathering is a relatively new area of painting for me, hence the challenge!

Working with some new materials was a central aspect – especially with regards to weathering and rusting techniques.  My journey started in August with Armorcast’s 3-crater set and using Vallejo Pigments.  Subsequently, I followed that project up with putting together five ruined buildings and six sci-fi walls (both from Armorcast as well).  They included:

To complete the project, and work on my techniques, I made a list of goals.  I desired to employ several new (to me) technical skills, materials, and techniques.  I ended up checking off on all of these except for using the Citadel “Nihilakh Oxide” and the Vallejo Mecha Weathering “Oil Stains (Gloss)” as they proved to be unneeded.

Below is my initial list of goals – the ones in bold were ones used and apply to this post.

  • Assembling, building, and basing terrain
  • Use of materials to create weathering and rusting effects, to include:
    • Vallejo Pigments, to include application and fixing (covered in this blog post)
    • Vallejo Mecha Color weathering products
    • Weathering and rusting/oxidizing effect products, to incude:
      • Citadel Technical paints:
        • Typhus Corrosion
        • Ryza Rust
        • Nihilakh Oxide
      • Vallejo and Vallejo Mecha Color rusting and weathering products
        • Vallejo Pigments (various)
        • Vallejo Game Air rusts (71.069 and 71.080)
        • Vallejo Mecha Color Weathering products
          • Oil Stains (gloss)
          • Rust Wash
          • Rust Texture (Matt)
  • Create a new storage system for my terrain pieces

I am glad that I got to use most of them.  The buildings will be discussed first, and then the walls, and finally my storage box work.  I will aim for plenty of visuals, and there will be eye candy at the end!  I will list a lessons learned section and a materials section at the end of the post for those interested.  This should hopefully be useful for some of you.

Ruined Buildings

1 Armorcast Building as received
My one ACRB009 as received.  The resin was definitely in need of a clean up with an Exacto blade, but that’s to be expected.  I also found that using Scotch-Brite pads on the resin and washing them thoroughly aided with priming.

2 T section clean up
This is the T-section as received.  It had some larger areas of excess resin on the lower portion to remove as you see here.

3 section with door blast hole
My one ACRB008 as received.  I was intrigued by the battle damage on all of these, especially on the garage door here.

4 base polystyrene
After assembling my buildings with Gorilla Glue and some green stuff, I based them on this polystyrene.  I had cut the sheets into irregular shapes.  I glued steel bases from Wargames Accessories on the bottoms for strength and future magnetic storage.

5 basing
Some of the buildings on their polystyrene bases before I added a play sand/rocks/PVA glue mix to act as a rough surface gradient.  The sci-fi walls are on steel bases that are similar to those under the buildings’ bases (more on them below).

5a basing
Here you can see the irregularly-cut shapes of the polystyrene.  My thought was to create pieces that were diorama-like for gaming.

6 buildings based and primed
Good close-up shot of the ruined buildings after the PVA/sand/rock mix had hardened and they had been primed gray.  I had affixed the bases to upturned plastic plates with poster tack, and put a mark on each plate to help as a locator reference for airbrushing.  This allowed me to avoid handling the painted surfaces.

7 early base coat on buildings holes
I was not sure how best to do the shell holes.  I started with black paint, then tried to ashen them up with some pigment later.  You may notice the rocks are tan – this was because I applied Vallejo “Light Yellow Ochre” pigment and Vallejo “Pigment Binder” on them – after I learned with the crater project that using airbrush thinner loosened the rocks.

8 Tsection base coated
I focused on completing the T-section first as a “guinea pig”.  I thought I could dry brush the bricks, but that did not work well at all.  I painted each brick by hand individually with Vallejo Mecha Color “SZ Red”…on ALL of these.  As I grew up in an old industrial area in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, old factory walls were something with which I was familiar.  These had a goodly amount of old plaster sculpted on them, which got some old Polly Scale “WWII British Aircraft Gull Gray Light”.  Clearly, there would be a need for weathering!

9 fixing pigments on t section
So now the weathering!  Here I have dirtied up the walls with Vallejo “Dark Slate Grey” pigment, and put a mix of four Vallejo pigments (“Light Yellow Ochre”, “Light Sienna”, “Natural Umber”, and “Faded Olive Green”) on the base.  I fixed the base pigments with the capillary technique (Vallejo airbrush thinner drops applied from a brush), and then airbrushed the walls with thinner.

10a tsection view 1
I used the “wet mode” technique and the “Faded Olive Green” to make the bottoms of the walls appear as if moss and mold were growing.  The Vallejo Pigment video on YouTube is very helpful.  The T-section was varnished with Vallejo Mecha Varnish “Matt Varnish” and allowed to dry overnight.  I added tufts from Army Painter and Shadow’s Edge miniatures.  Later, I would darken this with a gray wash.  As this is a T-section, there are three views.

10b tsection view 2
View 2 of T-section.

10c tsection view 3
View 3 of T-section.  Interestingly, one of the reasons that I had difficulty with the dry brushing of the bricks is that they are sculpted differently on different sides.  I found that using the gray as plaster to cover areas I thought needed help was able to mask this.

12 all buildings base coated with t section
After finishing the T-section, I moved on to the other buildings in a similar way, except that these had remnants of window sills, shell holes, and rusty doors to paint and weather…and about a million bricks (or at least it felt that way when I was painting them).

13 early rust work on the doors
My attempts at rusting here were not pigment-based.  Here, I used a combination of Citadel rusting products (“Typhus Corrosion” and “Ryza Rust”) in conjunction with Vallejo Mecha Weathering products (“Light Rust Wash”,”Dark Rust Wash”,  and “Rust Texture Matt”), and Vallejo Game Air “Rust” (2 types – 080 and 069).  I layered them on, dry brushed, and layered more.  I wanted the ground to show that rust had been accumulating on the ground for some time, and the Vallejo “Dark Rust Wash” was my go-to here.

14 interior after rusting door
Another view of the ACRB008 interior.

15 drying ground pigments in sun
After using similar pigments to those that I used on the T-section, I let them dry in the sun on my driveway (it was over 90 degrees Fahrenheit!).  I then varnished them similar to the T-section. After I saw my results, I was happy, but wanted a dirtier look even still, so all of the buildings got an additional wash with Secret Weapons Washes “Stone”.  That did the trick!

16 buildings washed, flocked, done
All my ruined buildings complete.

Sci-Fi Walls

1 wall with blast hole as received
Moving on to the walls!  This is my one ACW007 as received.  I liked the battle damage here as well.

2 other wall as received
This is one of my two “High Tech Walls 1”.  This is one side…

2a other wall as received reverse side
…and here is the other side.  I prepped these pieces similarly to the way I did the buildings.

3 based on steel
My basing for these would just be steel bases from Wargames Accessories.  I wanted to be able to line them up on the tabletop.  I also put these on upturned plates as before.

4 on plates and primed
Instead of sand and PVA for flocking, here I just used Army Painter Black Battlefields.  Priming was then done on them in my usual way.

5 base coated in light steel
After priming, I base coated them all with Vallejo Game Air “Steel” with my airbrush.  My goal was to build the rust up from here.

6 after a wash with light rust
Next, I used my airbrush to apply Vallejo Mecha Weathering “Light Rust”.

7 bulding up the rust
Next, I airbrushed both Vallejo Game Air Rust (080 and 069) in bursts and along deep areas.  The label on the Vallejo Mecha Weathering “Rust Texture (Matt)” says it is able to be airbrushed…please note IT IS NOT!!!  It jammed up both of my airbrushes badly (one needed a new nozzle afterwards).  After this, I decided to use a regular brush and use “Typhus Corrosion”, “Ryza Rust”, Nuln Oil (Gloss)”, as well as my previous products to give the walls and the battle damage a randomly -rusted and realistic appearance.  Washing, dry brushing, stippling, etc…

8 washes and more washes
The walls all painted, awaiting pigments on bases and varnish.  I decided not to use rusting pigments here as I was happy with the way these looked.

9 high tech walls 1 front and back
After pigments, varnishing, and flocking – this is both High Tech Walls with each side completed and shown for display.

10a high tech walls 2 view 1
This is the completed ACW007 – one side…

10b high tech walls 2 view 2
…and the other side.

000 a month of terrain
All my Armorcast terrain work from August and September together.

New Storage System/Box

Now that I had all this new terrain, especially the buildings, I needed a good efficient way to store and transport them to my games.  I decided to use a 32-liter Really Useful Box and to design a level inside to optimize its volume.  Essentially, I built a tray with legs to insert into the box and make it into multiple levels.  I plan on repeating this for other terrain in my collection.  Note that I use Aleene’s Magnetic Tacky Sheets from Michael’s to line the storage surfaces.   

1 Box
Box from outside showing the two levels.  I used a thin sheet of plywood and 5/8″ square dowels with #6 wood screws to make the tray.  I cut two small handle slots so that the tray could be picked up easily.  Luckily, the magnetic sheets cut easily with scissors for sizing.

2 Box
The box bottom with the tray removed on the left.

3 Box
Good view of the tray next to the box.

4 Box
Here’s a top view of the tray in the box.

Lessons Learned

I have several “lessons learned” about this project, and I also got great feedback on my last crater post.  One area of feedback that I got was from Azazel who suggested I needed a gaming mat.  I had wanted to get one or two, but they are indeed expensive.  Thanks to advice from him on my last post (and all of you who give me feedback – I thank you all from the bottom of my heart) – and that’s the truth!

Anyways, I got two neoprene (mouse pad material) mats from Gamemat.eu in the Czech Republic.  One is “Wastelands”, and the other one is “Highlands in War”.  I think both will work well with my terrain, and you can see them in the “eye candy” section below the lessons learned.

So here are the lessons and thoughts I have from the project – some are the same as the crater project, and some are new – but I though I’d try to be complete and list them all here:

  1. The cleaning and scrubbing of the resin helped with the priming.  The Scotch-Brite pads work well for this use.
  2. Armorcast terrain pieces are fairly priced and a good value.  The quality was easy to work with, and any issues were easy to address with green stuff.
  3. For terrain pieces that will be totally covered in pigments, priming them is not needed.  
  4. You can indeed airbrush a wash, but NEVER try to airbrush anything with “texture” in it, no matter what the label says (maybe a bigger nozzle might work, but I only have one size).
  5. Fixing pigments with airbrush thinner is easier than with pigment binder.  However, add any additional large features, such as extra rocks later, or use pigment binder on the rocks.
  6. Affixing larger models to plastic dinner plates is a good option for handling without touching the painted surfaces. 
  7. Having trays and palette wells (such as the one I put my pigment palette in) while working with pigments cuts down on the mess considerably.  Be ready to use multiple brushes, both wet and dry.  The mess vacuumed up or washed off easily from my palettes and trays.
  8. Always ensure your pigment bottles are shut tight.  I see how they could spill over easily.
  9. PVA glue and play sand are an inexpensive winner.
  10. The combination of thin steel and thin polystyrene yields a model base with little to any “rise” from the tabletop at its edge, and is strong.
  11. Real rusting takes time and is random.  So is weathering it.  The Vallejo and Citadel products I used were really nice.  I do see how the pigments would be useful for rusting and will have to try that too sometime.
  12. Thin your varnish to prevent the crazing! You can airbrush the thinner easily directly on pigments, just need to watch the airflow so they are not blown off.
  13. The Vallejo pigments video is a must see for newbies.
  14. Washes help in the end for touch ups.
  15. Love my storage box design!
  16. Shadow’s Edge Miniatures tufts are fantastic – need no extra glue and dry clearly.
  17. I love my new game mats!!

Eye Candy!

17 defense of the buildings frogs v Martians and Robot Peacekeepers
The Highlands mat showing the F.R.O.G. Commandos defending the ruined buildings and craters against the Martians, the Robot Peacekeepers, and a couple of Mark 1 Sphere tanks.

18 MArtians swarm building and the craters19 Frogbot holds the gap20 root peacekeepers swarm other flank21 top view of setup22 defenders view23 holding!24 holding! (2)25 last

Now for the walls on the “Wastelands” mat!  Here we have the F.R.O.G. Commandos getting picked on again and getting assaulted by Archive Warbots, Roberker, and more Mark 1 Sphere tanks – will they hold?

11 top view frogs behind walls v robots
Go Frogs, RIBBIT!

11a top view frogs behind walls v robots12 left wall view frogs behind walls v robots

13 tight wall view frogs behind walls v robots
Time for fried frog legs – and the rest too!

13a tight wall view frogs behind walls v robots

Hopefully you found this post fun and informative.  Please leave any feedback or suggestions in the comments section – and I realize that this was a long post, so if you’re still reading, THANKS!

PAINTS, PIGMENTS, INKS, GLUES, GLAZES, WASHES, AND FLOCKING USED:

  1. Vallejo “Surface Primer – Gray”
  2. Vallejo “Airbrush Thinner”
  3. Vallejo “Airbrush Flow Improver”
  4. Army Painter “Black Battlefields” (flocking)
  5. Green stuff (kneadatite)
  6. Generic play sand
  7. Elmer’s “Glue-All”
  8. SceneARama “Rocks”
  9. Vallejo “Pigment Binder”
  10. Evergreen Scale Models #9020 0.5 mm plain polystyrene sheets
  11. Gorilla Glue
  12. Wargames Accessories steel bases (various)
  13. Vallejo Game Air “Wood”
  14. Vallejo Game Air “Steel”
  15. Americana “Raw Umber”
  16. Polly Scale “WWII Luftwaffe Uniform Gray”
  17. Vallejo Mecha Color “Dark Steel”
  18. Vallejo Mecha Color “SZ Red”
  19. Polly Scale “WWII British Aircraft Gull Gray Light”
  20. Vallejo “Black”
  21. Vallejo “Dark Slate Grey” (pigment)
  22. Vallejo “Light Slate Grey” (pigment)
  23. Vallejo “Light Sienna” (pigment)
  24. Vallejo “Faded Olive Green” (pigment)
  25. Vallejo “Light Yellow Ochre” (pigment)
  26. Vallejo “Natural Umber” (pigment)
  27. Citadel “Balor Brown”
  28. Citadel “Skrag Brown”
  29. Polly S “Rust”
  30. Vallejo Mecha Weathering “Rust Texture (Matt)”
  31. Vallejo Game Air “Rust 069”
  32. Vallejo Game Air “Rust 080”
  33. Citadel “Typhus Corrosion”
  34. Citadel “Ryza Rust”
  35. Vallejo Mecha Weathering “Dark Rust Wash” (wash)
  36. Citadel “Valhallan Blizzard”
  37. Vallejo “Titanium White” (pigment)
  38. Vallejo “Carbon/Smoke Black” (pigment)
  39. Secret Weapons Washes “Stone” (wash)
  40. Vallejo Mecha Weathering “Light Rust Wash” (wash)
  41. Citadel “Nuln Oil (Gloss)”
  42. Citadel “Niblet Green”
  43. Citadel “Athonian Camoshade” (wash)
  44. Citadel “Agrax Earthshade” (wash)
  45. Testors “Universal Acrylic Thinner”
  46. Vallejo Mecha Varnish “Matt Varnish”
  47. Army Painter “Wasteland Tufts”
  48. Shadow’s Edge Miniatures “12 mm tufts”

Thanks again – and please let me know your thoughts and suggestions in the comments section!

 

 

 

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